PIN LIE DUAN SHE; A SPECIAL EXHIBITION OF SUNGHUA INKSTONE : COMPARABLE TO THE BEST TUAN AND SHE INKSTONES Songhua shi yan te zhan = A Special exhibition of Sunghua inkstone : comparable to the best Tuan and She inkstones

By: Guo Li Gu Gong Bo Wu Yuan

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Book Condition: Fine in Fine dust jacket


Mandarin Chinese and English Edition; Color Illustrations; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 322 pages; PIN LIE DUAN SHE; A SPECIAL EXHIBITION OF SUNGHUA INKSTONE : COMPARABLE TO THE BEST TUAN AND SHE INKSTONES. 1st ptg Sept 1993. In a cloth slipcase [NF]. Text is in both Chinese and English. 91 photographic plates [some are full page], of stones in beautiful colors along with numerous textural cuts in b/w. I can do no better than to quote Chi, Jo-hsin's brief summary of their history. The combination of brush, paper, ink stick and inkstone, commonly known as the "Four Treasures of the Scholar's Studio," make up the principal tools of the Chinese literati. Made of most durable material—stone slabs, jade, ceramics or lacquer—the inkstone is the best preserved of the Four Treasures. The history of the inkstone proper begins in the Warring States period (ca. 5th century B. C. -3rd century B. C. ). Traditionally, the tuan stones of Kuangtung, she stones of An-huei, t'ao-ho stones of Kansuh and red ribbon stones of Shantung were the prestigious. Scant attention, however, was paid to the sunghua stone. Materials for sunghua inkstones are found in the Chi-lin and Liaoning provinces. Stones found in Chi-lin have green striations, while stones from Liaoning have either yellow and green or purple and green striations. Yet another stone, found in the northeast and featuring yellow striations, is also classified as a type of sunghua stone. In terms of stone quality, the sunghua inkstones from Chi-lin were most highly regarded, considered to be "comparable to the best tuan and she inkstones." Prior to the Ch'ing dynasty, sunghua stones were primarily used as whetstones. The emperor K'ang-hsi, however, elevated its status to inkstone material, and sunghua inkstones and ink boxes became popular during the reigns of Yung-cheng and Ch'ien-lung. Due to the belief that the origin of the sunghua stone was at the heart of Manchuria, these inkstones became important diplomatic and political gifts. The Sunghua Inkstones of the K'ang-hsi periodInscriptions found on inkstones from the reign of K'ang-hsi are numerous, ranging from the standard imperial reign mark ("Year of K'ang-hsi") to various laudatory imperial seals. Longer and more elegant inscriptions praising the quality of the stone, such as "Used in tranquility, this inkstone will last lifetimes," are also common. The decorative motifs found on K'ang-hsi inkstones often depict traditional and classical patterns. A fish fossil or a small window of glass is often used as a lid, and shells likewise are inlaid on the ink pool. Shapes of inkstones themselves vary greatly, taking square, circular, oblong, and rectangular forms, while ink boxes take on more adventurous non-geometric shapes such as fish and magnolia. The Sunghua Inkstones of the Yung-cheng periodDuring the reign of the emperor Yung-cheng, innovative designs in the shapes of the inkstones began appearing, imitating such forms as bamboo, ju-i heads, gourds and intersecting circles. The designs on the periphery and interior of the ink pool, the inkstone periphery, and the lid face incorporated auspicious symbols, which were used in various inscriptions. In addition to auspicious inscriptions, the tradition of adding imperial reign marks, customary during the K'ang-hsi reign, continued. The Sunghua Inkstones of the Ch'ien-lung periodInscriptions of the Ch'ien-lung period are also numerous, from the imperial mark to imperial seals expressing Ch'ien-lung's favor and prayers for eternal prosperity. During this period, attention to design on the face of the inkstone gave way to a new emphasis on ink pool shapes. Because court painters often acted as designers for the inkstones, designs found on the cover of the inkstones were identical to the painting styles of the court at the time. The covers of the inkstones became magnificently similar to the imperial landscape, floral, and fauna paintings of the time. Author: Chi, Jo-hsin

Title: PIN LIE DUAN SHE; A SPECIAL EXHIBITION OF SUNGHUA INKSTONE : COMPARABLE TO THE BEST TUAN AND SHE INKSTONES Songhua shi yan te zhan = A Special exhibition of Sunghua inkstone : comparable to the best Tuan and She inkstones

Author Name: Guo Li Gu Gong Bo Wu Yuan

Categories: Chinese,

Edition: First Edition; First Printing

Publisher: Taipei, National Palace Museum: 1993

ISBN Number: 9575621573

ISBN Number 13: 9789575621575

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition: Fine in Fine dust jacket

Seller ID: 33535